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The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms - Sammut, Clive

International Register of Armorial Bearings (Coats of Arms)


 
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Last Update: 05/10/2022
 



Clive Sammut, Señor de Saccaja

Registered: The International Register of Arms, 5th October 2022. Registration No. 0656 (Vol.4).

Arms: Quarterly 1st and 4th, per chevron Azure and Vert, a chevronel between in chief two mullets and in base an artillery wheel Or; 2nd and 3rd, Gules, a Roman breast plate ensigned of a Centurion’s Galea helmet Proper. An escutcheon of pretence Gules three pales wavy Or.

Crest: Upon the coronet of a Señor, an eagle rising wings addorsed and elevated Sable beaked and legged Or holding in its beak a belt of Gold.

Motto: Nosce Te Ipsum.

Private Registration: Chronicler of Arms of Castilla and León, H.E. Don Alfonso de Ceballos-Escalera y Gila, Marquis de La Floresta, 11th May 2020 No. 28/2020.


Artist: Dr. Joseph Crews, Persevante León Blanco.


Arorial Bearings of
                                              Clive Sammut, Señor de
                                              Saccaja
The quarterings on the main shield consist of arms representing Sammut and Galea, the armiger’s father's surname and mother’s maiden surnames respectively.
 
Sammut is one of the oldest surnames in Malta and it has been assertained that the armiger’s direct patrilineal line, which has been traced generation by generation back to 1505, hailed from the medieval hamlet of Hal-Samud; the surname was originally written as Samudi then became Samud, Samut and finally, in the 17th century, became consistently Sammut.  The surname is included in a 1419 list of Militia men over 18 years of age, who were obliged by law to take part in the guarding of the coast against Muslim corsair raids. There is also some sparse evidence that suggests that the surname can be seen in a more primitive Islamic form with a Maltese poet at the Palermitan Court of King Roger II with the name of Abdallâh ibn al-Samati al-Mâliti and this can be dated back to the middle of the 12th century. Besides, a Saracenic headstone bearing the name Ibrahim al-Samti was discovered in Malta’s old capital Mdina from approximately the same time period.

The shield is a modified version of the Sammut arms used generally by the Sammut families. Instead of the usual Tau cross under the chevron (or chevronel), this version includes an artillery wheel which represents a family tradition of being engineers as well as one of the armiger’s passions, the collection and research of historic military vehicles. The background colours represent the grass on which the wheel stands, while the blue and two stars represent the sky.
 
The surname Galea is another very old surname in Malta and can also be traced to the Militia list of 1419.Once again, the shield is the modified classic Galea shield and it shows a Roman suit of armour, or breastplate, on top of which is a Centurion’s Galea helmet.
 
The central shield is that of the Inguanez family from which all of the armiger’s four grandparents descend. The Inguanez, originally Desguanech, family came to Malta in 1400 when the father of Antonio, the first holder of the fief of Saccaja came to Malta from Catalunya to serve as Castillan on behalf of the Aragonese Crown. The fief of Saccaja was granted in 1442 to Antonio for his military services, free of all obligations. Antonio Inguanez married Imperia Gatto whose father and grandfather were also Castillans at the Castrum Maris, stronghold of the Aragonese Crown in Malta. The older Gatto was granted the fief of the Djar il-Bniet estate and made a Hereditary Knight of the Cingolo Militare in 1350. This is represented on the arms by the eagle holding a Belt (Cingolo) in its beak. By way of artistic embellishment, the vent in the helm is the Gatto family coat of arms of 10 bezants. The armiger still lives on the Djar il-Bniet estate.
 
The motto Nosce Te Ipsum (know thyself) is inspired by the armiger’s second passion, Genealogy, although he is not a professional genealogist. The coronet is that of a Spanish Senor.
 
 

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The Armorial Bearings of Clive Sammut, Señor de Saccaja