The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms

  Subscribe to the Armorial Newsletter
THE ARMORIAL NEWSLETTER
Subscribe to The Armorial Newsletter
 for Registry and Heraldic & Genealogical News
  The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms
THE ARMORIAL REGISTER
International Register of Arms
Volume 1 & Volume 2
 
 

The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms - van Dievoet,J,B

International Register of Armorial Bearings (Coats of Arms)

 
THIS WEBSITE
Home
Search The Register
Register Your Arms
Feudal Lords & Barons
Armorial Shop-Store
Heraldic Artists
History of Heraldry
Advertising Program
Heraldic Authorities
Heraldic Societies
Useful Links
Registry News
Monthly Newsletter
Armorial Forum
AR on FaceBook
Contact
Site Map
ARMORIAL FAMILIES

The Crest of The Armorial Register - Click to see Full Achievement

 
 
 
Last Update: 26/08/2020

Web Design HCS

Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet I (1663-1751)

Registered: The International Register of Arms, 19th June. 2020. Registration No. 0557 (Vol.4).

Arms: Per pale Argent and Sable, on a tower embattled of four merlons counterchanged and gated of the field between in chief two mullets of six-points Gules and Or and in base a crescent counterchanged, an escutcheon per pale Or and Gules charged with a dexter human foot sole counterchanged.

Motto: None

Grant: Certificate delivered to him, on 14 October 1698, by Joseph van den Leene (1654-1742), First King of Arms for the Low Countries, the Duchy of Burgundy, and the Order of the Golden Fleece, this office was called Toison d’Or.

Emblazonments by Quentin Peacock and Ljubodrag Grujic

The Arms of Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet (1663-1751)

The arms are canting: the foot sole is a play on words on the surname of the armiger as voet means foot in Dutch. It also seems that the etymology of “Dievoet” influenced the design of the arms. DIVIDERE means dividing in Latin, and DIE means day, thus, the shield is divided between night and day. The crescent is also split between night and day and represents Diana, the goddess of the moon, often accompanied in ancient iconography by Phosphorus (the morning star, here seen at dexter) and Hesperus (the evening star, at sinister). A DIVIDICULUM means a castle (tower) placed on a division of land, or a ford (the etymology of “Dievoet” is either “sacred ford” or “public ford”).

Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet I (1663–1751) was baptised on 6 March 1663 in the St. Gudula collegiate church, and died in Brussels on 4 April 1751 in the house he built called the Iron Dragon. It was so named due to being located where, according to the legend, the dragon that Saint Gaugericus slayed had its lair. He was buried in the family's tomb located in the church of the Franciscan Recollects convent of Brussels. He was a wine merchant and dean of the Coopers Guild of Brussels. He was a churchwarden of St. Gudula.

Jean-Baptiste was the son of Gilles van Dievoet (died before 1672), bourgeois of Brussels, and of Gertrude Zeevaert (died 22 July 1705).

He was the brother of the famous sculptor Peter (or Pierre) van Dievoet (1661–1729) who sculpted a number of the guild houses of the Grand Place of Brussels as well as the statue of King James II now located in Trafalgar Square. He was also the half-brother of the goldsmith Philippe van Dievoet called Vandive, councillor of King Louis XIV.

The Arms of Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet I

In 1696, he married Anne van der Borcht (1670–1707). They had nine children:

1) Pierre van Dievoet (1697–1740), studied at the Faculty of Civil Law of the University of Louvain, priest, vicar, vice-pléban, and secretary of the chapter of Anderlecht;
2) Gertrude van Dievoet (1698–1731);
3) Catherine van Dievoet ( 1699–1745);
4) Dorothée-Philippine van Dievoet (1700–1722), Benedictine nun at the Kortenberg Abbey;
5) Anne-Marie van Dievoet (1702–1792), wife of Jean-Noël Bodesse (1704–1772), notary, solicitor at the Council of Brabant;
6) Marie-Anne-Thérèse van Dievoet (1703–1738), wife of Jean-François van den Velde, dean of the goldsmiths' guild;

7) Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet II (1704–1776), dean of the wine merchants’ guild, husband of Elisabeth van der Meulen (1720–1769);
8) Pierre-Jacques-Joseph van Dievoet, (1706–1764), studied at the Faculty of Arts of the University of Louvain, priest, canon, and treasurer at the chapter of Anderlecht;
9) Nicolas van Dievoet (1707–1708).

 
 

© The Armorial Register - International Register of Arms 2020

 

Register your Arms - International Armorial Register

Search By Surname

 
A B C D E F G H I J
K L M N O P Q R S
T U V W X Y Z

 

NEED AN HERALDIC ARTIST?

Contact us for

Further Information

The Armorial Bearings of Jean-Baptiste van Dievoet I