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Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Fri Jan 20, 2017 10:58 am
by J Duncan of Sketraw
The Arms of Dr. George Manuel Burden, Baron of Seabegs, Scotland

Image

Entry: http://www.armorial-register.com/arms-s ... -arms.html

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 4:00 am
by Michael F. McCartney
Nice simple design

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Jan 22, 2017 2:53 pm
by Martin Goldstraw
Michael F. McCartney wrote:
Sun Jan 22, 2017 4:00 am
Nice simple design
Indeed, though I've had lots of fun this last week asking family and friends "What colour is a a red spruce tree?" :D

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 2:29 am
by Michael F. McCartney
😁

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 8:38 am
by Chris Green
I readily admit that I last studied Latin 50 years ago, but I fear that the Latin for The Health of the Family is not Salus Familias. Salus certainly means health. The Romans had a goddess named Salus who was prayed to for health and prosperity. But it is more usually associated with safety and well-being, as in the saying Salus Populi Suprema Lex. Sanitas is more accurate if Health is intended to mean freedom from sickness. Familias is accusative plural and of the family is genitive singular. To express what Dr Burden seems to have had in mind, the motto should therefore be Sanitas Familiae. Lord Lyon's Court really should have picked up on that.

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Mon Jan 23, 2017 3:58 pm
by Michael F. McCartney
Two lessons:
* The value of posting on a site like this one before, rather than after, the fact.
* The advantage of considering a motto in one's own language!

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:21 pm
by Baron of Seabegs
I want to thank Chris Green for his comments and appreciate the President of the International Association of Amateur Heralds taking time to comment on my arms and motto. I should point out that the current definition of health by family physicians and the WHO is most definitely not "absence of disease" but rather a state of well-being much along the lines of the Roman concept of Salus.
(https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2080455/)

Secondly, while the given translation is "Health of the Family" the intended meaning as discussed with the Lord Lyon was: "to induce in families a state of wellness" hence the use of the plural accusative. This motto as used is an intentional and abbreviated form of the full Latin phrase in keeping with the reverse mottoes of ancient Roman coins. As per ancient coinage the verb is inferred from the context.

After 30 years of collecting and translating ancient Roman coins I have seen the Salus reverse many times. The concept of Salus nicely summarizes the state in which I would like to see the families for which I care. (BTW I recently donated the Seabegs Collection of Ancient Roman Coinage, 182 silver, gold and bronze coins, to my alma mater, several exemplars of which feature the Salus reverse.) Link: https://www.dal.ca/faculty/arts/classic ... _more.html

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 2:23 pm
by Baron of Seabegs
As an addendum, the reason I wished my motto to be in Latin is that that Seabegs Wood, in the northern portion of the barony, is designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as it holds the best preserved section of the ancient Roman Antonine Wall in southern Scotland. In fact the former caput baroniam or baronial seat is a motte and bailey style castle, one wall of which actually incorporates the Antonine Wall.

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/vi ... begs-wood/

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 3:28 pm
by Chris Green
I thank Dr Burden for his measured response to my somewhat impertinent dismissal of the accuracy of his motto.

This is perhaps a good place to warn that the pitfalls with foreign language mottoes are many:

1) That they will err grammatically;

2) That they will not mean quite what was intended;

3) That others will assume that something else was intended;

4) That they will be so obscure as to be incomprehensible to any but the originator (and anyone to whom (s)he has explained the inwardness).

The herald and his/her client must both be extremely careful if the latter desires a foreign language motto that is original. Neither should rely on the other being the expert. Had Dr Burden proposed Salus Familias to me, I would have listened carefully to his explanation, explained why I thought Sanitas Familiae was more accurate, and then encouraged him to find someone whose Latin studies were more profound and much more recent than my own.

PS: This advice applies in spades to those considering a foreign language tattoo!

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Apr 23, 2017 6:03 pm
by Baron of Seabegs
Thank you Chris for your cogent reply to my comment. I agree that there may be many pitfalls to coining new mottoes in dead languages. While I have a certain partiality to ancient Roman culture I would advise others to stick to their native languages when coining new mottoes and especially a tattoo.

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Fri May 12, 2017 11:57 am
by Kurt Alex
To all who enjoy a bit of etymology now and again.

From www. phrases.org.uk

In spades

Meaning

In abundance; very much.

Origin

It's easy to believe that this expression derives from the imagery of digging with spades and that 'in spades' is just short for 'in spadefuls'. However, the spades concerned here aren't the garden tools but the suit of cards. Spades is the highest ranking suits in the game of Contract Bridge, a very popular pastime in the USA in the early 20th century, which is when and where the phrase originated.

Despite the agricultural-sounding name and the shovel-like shape, the suit in cards has nothing directly to do with garden spades. Playing Cards originated in Asia and spread across Europe around the 14th century, arriving in England a little later than in Spain, Italy and Germany.

In spadesThe Italian versions of early cards used the suits Cups, Swords, Coins and Batons, which, on migration to England, became Hearts, Spades, Diamonds and Clubs. The image for Spades on English and French cards looks somewhat like that of the German Acorn or Leaf suits, but its origin is revealed by its name rather than its shape. The Spanish and Italian for sword is 'espada' and 'spada' respectively, hence the suit 'Swords' became anglicized as 'Spades'.

We have been 'calling a spade a spade' for many centuries, but the expression 'in spades' is a 20th century US coinage. The term was often used before that in relation to card games, where Bridge contracts might be entered into in the minor suits of Clubs or Diamonds or, for the higher scores, 'in Hearts' or, best of all, 'in Spades'.

The figurative meaning, that is, the non-cards-related 'very greatly' meaning, isn't found before the 1920s. The American journalist and writer Damon Runyon used the expression that way in a piece for Hearst's International magazine, in October 1929:

"I always hear the same thing about every bum on Broadway, male and female, including some I know are bums, in spades, right from taw."

It isn't possible to be sure that the figurative 'in spades' derives from Bridge, but the coincidence of the time and place of the origin of the expression and the popularity of the card game certainly does suggest a connection.

Regards from South Carolina

Kurt Alex, Ph. D.

Re: Dr. George M. Burden, Baron of Seabegs No.0417

Posted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 3:00 pm
by Baron of Seabegs
Thanks for the lesson. I am a big fan of etymology, which, as my seven year old daughter once informed me: "... is not just about the study of ants, Daddy!"