Tomb symbols

Heraldry in Arms and Armour
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S Parker-Galbreath
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Tomb symbols

Post by S Parker-Galbreath » Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:27 am

In Astley Church Worcestershire is the tomb of Walter Blount / Blounte. He died on 3 Oct. 1561, but his will wasn't proved until four years later. His son Robert died in 1573 and in his will was a bequest to build tombs in the church for himself & for his father Walter. Walter's father Thomas was a knight but Walter was only described as "Esquire". The tomb that was erected for him shows him wearing armour, with a helmet under his head, gauntlets by his side, a chain round his neck, an open book in his hand and a lion at his feet. I have read that this means he died by the sword at war, is this correct? I can't find any battles in 1561.
Thanks
Simon
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J Duncan of Sketraw
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Re: Tomb symbols

Post by J Duncan of Sketraw » Mon Mar 12, 2018 3:28 pm

S Parker-Galbreath wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 4:27 am
I have read that this means he died by the sword at war, is this correct?
Thanks
Simon
I personally never heard of this before, it could mean a number of things or just artistic licence.
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John A. Duncan of Sketraw

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Martin Goldstraw
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Re: Tomb symbols

Post by Martin Goldstraw » Mon Mar 12, 2018 8:27 pm

I would tend to agree with John on this. Neither of us can claim to speak with any particular authority on this and I don't have any reference books specifically on monuments of this nature however, I do have a copy of Macklin's Monumental Brasses by John Page-Phillips. The book goes to great length to describe the various forms of these monuments which are obviously two dimensional but it does refers to tomb monuments (because they are three dimensional). There is mention of fashion including changes in fashion of armour but there is no mention of any significance of how a particular monument is set out.

If you are interested in identifying periods by way of fashion, it is a useful book to have. There may well be a similar work on tomb monuments.
Martin Goldstraw

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