Use of Badge

Application, uses and display of Heraldry
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Andrew J Vidal
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Use of Badge

Post by Andrew J Vidal » Fri Feb 23, 2007 3:10 am

Hello all! I have a question regarding the use of badges (not in the Scottish sense of clan badge, but personal heraldic badge). The avatar I use is the badge that was designed for me by Chap (Loren Chapulin) and I have used it as letter head before, but I'm not sure if that is a correct use of it. I know I could use it as a seal/stamp, but the stamper I have is of my full achievement and I plan on having a seal made of my arms, torse and crest. Where else could I use a badge correctly?
Best Wishes,

Andrew

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J Duncan of Sketraw
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Post by J Duncan of Sketraw » Fri Feb 23, 2007 4:47 am

Well what about a lapel pin or, a broach for the wife (oh that might not be a good idea), business cards or a T shirt. I think the application for using a badge are pretty endless.
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John A. Duncan of Sketraw

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Martin Goldstraw
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Post by Martin Goldstraw » Mon Feb 26, 2007 8:02 pm

Very broadly speaking heraldic badges are used more for ones followers than by oneself. This is why, in Scotland at least, badges (and I use the term badge as in Andrew's question and not as in Scottish Crest badge)are not assigned to anyone who does not have a "tail" (following).

If you look at the British Crown, you will see many examples of Royal Badges being used by the subjects of the Crown and the two most obvious examples (to subjects of the Crown at least) are the Portcullis badge now used widely by Government departments carrying out the function of the Crown such as Customs and Excise and the Inland Revenue and those of us with a few years under our belt may remember the old prison uniforms (not I hasten to add by personal experience) which were festooned with the pheon badge of the Crown.

Taking these examples then anyone who is a follower could wear your badge, be it employee or family (perhaps it might be best if you don't tell the wife she is a follower when you present her with that nice wee silver "broach").

Badges can also be used in flying heraldry, the obvious example being the heraldic standard but you can also display your badge as a "Badge Banner" whereby the field of this rectangular ensign is divided per pale with your livery colours and the badge is displayed thereupon.

Example below of the badge banner of the Duke of York:
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Good luck and enjoy the use of your badge.
Martin Goldstraw

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